About the Project

 

The former Kings Park Psychiatric Center (KPPC) campus covers 521 acres in the Town of Smithtown in Suffolk County, Long Island.  At the peak of its operation in the 1950s, the Kings Park campus was operated by the New York State Office of Mental Health (OMH) as one of the largest mental health institutions in the world, with 10,000 patients housed in a self-sufficient “city” that had housing and dormitories to house thousands of staff and its own police and fire departments, railroad line, power plant, sewer system, farms, and manufacturing facilities.

OMH decommissioned the KPPC facility in 1996.  Today, more than 60 buildings constituting approximately 2.4 million square feet exist on the property.  The abandoned buildings range in size from small, single family homes to very large institutional buildings including a 13-story former resident and treatment facility and a 10-story hospital.   Virtually all of the buildings are boarded up, power and utilities were long ago turned off, and the campus’ numerous derelict buildings, dormitories, wards, hospital buildings, and residences, some of which are very large structures, continue to deteriorate.

In 2006, the New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation (OPRHP) received jurisdiction over approximately 368 acres of the former KPPC property, which was previously managed by the OMH. Subsequent to this acquisition, OPRHP contracted with a private engineering firm, Dvirka & Bartilucci Consulting Engineers (D&B), in 2008 to conduct a comprehensive study of the costs of remediating environmental hazards and demolishing the 50 vacant, deteriorated buildings on the 368 acres. The results of the study conducted determined that the total cost of remediating the 368 acres was approximately $216 million. Of the total $216 million estimate, $186 million (86%) is comprised of the cost of removing asbestos and other hazardous materials and then demolishing vacant buildings. The remaining elements of the $216 million estimate are primarily associated with: a) remediating asbestos and demolishing the five miles of underground steam tunnels that criss-cross the property ($26 million); and b) cleaning up C&D materials from prior building demolitions that were dumped on the surface or buried in the past before the property was transferred to OPRHP, as well as excavating other adversely impacted soil detected on-site ($4 million). 

Given a funding appropriation of approximately $14 million initiated by Senator John Flanagan and the New York State Senate in 2006 for the project, NYSOPRHP was able to advance the first phase of building demolition activities in March 2012 which focused on the “Fast-Track” demolition of 19 relatively small buildings/structures that were deteriorated to the point that there was no potential for future reuse of the structures.   Substantial completion of the “Fast Track” demolition phase was achieved in the early fall of 2013. NYSOPRHP has recently identified a second group of 10 select buildings/structures to be demolished as part of the next phase of demolition activities to be performed at the Site.  Construction in support of the second phase of demolition/site restoration activities are tentatively scheduled to start in April 2016 and expected to take 12 to 18 months to complete. The contractor selected by NYSOPRHP through the competitive bid process to complete the work is MPCC Corp. located in New Rochelle, New York at a total bid price of approximately $6.7M. Construction activities will be completed under the supervision of NYSOPRHP personnel. D&B Engineers and Architects, P.C. located in Woodbury, New York will also serve in a supporting role to provide inspection/engineering services during construction on behalf of NYSOPRHP. Provided below is an aerial photograph depicting the approximate locations of the former KPPC buildings/structures, as well as a brief description of the existing condition of each respective building/structure included as part of the second phase of demolition activities:


BUILDING 89 (COMFORT STATION) is a vacant one-story slab on grade brick building with a gable roof built in 1955. The exterior walls are constructed of a solid brick façade backed by block. Interior partitions are constructed of block and the ceiling is plaster. The roof consists of wood framing with asphalt shingles. Sections of the roof and attic floor are considerably deteriorated and collapsing into the building resulting in unsafe working conditions. Due to extensive collapse and deterioration of portions of the roof and attic floor, Building 89 has been condemned. For the purpose of this Phase, Building 89 is to be remediated of hazardous materials and demolished using controlled demolition procedures.

BUILDING 130 (MEDICAL STAFF HOUSING, COTTAGE F) is a two-story vacant structure with a partial basement/ crawlspace built in 1925. The exterior surface is mixed wood siding and brick. The framing consists of brick load bearing walls and wood joists supported by a wood girder on lally columns. The roof consists of wood framing supporting a slate shingled roof. Interior partitions are wood stud with plaster interior walls and ceilings. For the purpose of this Phase, Building 130 is to be remediated of hazardous materials and shall remain for future preservation and reuse.

BUILDING 131(MEDICAL STAFF HOUSING, COTTAGE G) is a two-story vacant structure with a partial basement/crawlspace built in 1925. The exterior surface is mixed wood siding and brick. The framing consists of brick load bearing walls and wood joists supported by a wood girder on lally columns. The roof consists of wood framing supporting a slate shingled roof. Interior partitions are wood stud with plaster interior walls and ceilings. For the purpose of this Phase, Building 131 is to be remediated of hazardous materials and subsequently demolished.

BUILDING 132 (MEDICAL STAFF HOUSING, COTTAGE H) is a two-story vacant structure with a partial basement and section of unfinished crawlspace built in 1925. The exterior surface is mixed wood siding and brick. The framing consists of brick load bearing walls and wood joists supported by a wood girder on lally columns. The roof consists of wood framing supporting a slate shingled roof. Interior partitions are wood stud with plaster interior walls and ceilings. With the goal of subsequent reuse in the future, Building 132 is to be remediated of hazardous materials and shall remain for future preservation and reuse.

BUILDING 133 (MEDICAL STAFF HOUSING, COTTAGE I) is a two-story vacant structure with a partial basement/crawlspace built in 1925. The exterior surface is mixed wood siding and brick. The framing consists of brick load bearing walls and wood joists supported by a wood girder on lally columns. The roof consists of wood framing supporting a slate shingled roof. Interior partitions are wood stud with plaster interior walls and ceilings. For the purpose of this Phase, Building 133 is to be remediated of hazardous materials and subsequently demolished.

BUILDING 134 (MEDICAL STAFF HOUSING, COTTAGE J) is a two-story vacant structure with a partial basement/crawlspace built in 1925. The exterior surface is mixed wood siding and brick. The framing consists of brick load bearing walls and wood joists supported by a wood girder on lally columns. The roof consists of wood framing supporting a slate shingled roof. Interior partitions are wood stud with plaster interior walls and ceilings. For the purpose of this Phase, Building 134 is to be remediated of hazardous materials and subsequently demolished.

BUILDING 135 (CONVALESCENT BUILDING) is a two story vacant brick building at the northern and southern wings, connected by an enclosed one-story slab on grade breezeway (west wing). The building was built in 1925. The exterior surface is mixed wood siding and brick. The roof consists of wood framing supporting a slate shingled roof, with the exception of the west wing which has a flat roof membrane construction. The construction consists of steel beams and columns supporting concrete floor slabs and steel roof trusses. The ceilings consist of plaster or exposed concrete and the interior partitions are constructed of hollow tile overlain by plaster and ceramic tile. The northern and southern wings have partial basements/crawlspaces. The central flat roof has deteriorated and is determined to be structurally unsafe. Due to this determination, the central portion of Building 135 (west wing) has been condemned and shall be demolished using controlled demolition procedures. For the purpose of this Phase, the remaining portions of Building 135 shall be remediated of hazardous materials and subsequently demolished. Additionally, a segment of steam tunnel associate with this structure will also undergo abatement of hazardous materials and subsequently demolished.

BUILDING 142 (ELDERLY LIVING BUILDING) is a one-story vacant brick building with a partial basement that was built in 1925. The construction consists of steel and concrete framing supporting concrete floor slabs and steel roof trusses. The roof is peaked with concrete roof planks covered with slate shingles. Interior partitions are hollow tile overlain by plaster, concrete, brick and ceramic tile. The ceilings are plaster.  For the purpose of this Phase, Building 142 is to be remediated of hazardous materials and subsequently demolished.  Additionally, a segment of steam tunnel associated with this structure will also undergo abatement of hazardous materials and subsequently demolished.

BUILDING 7 (MEDICAL SURGICAL, ADMINISTRATION OFFICES) is a thirteen-story vacant structure inclusive of a water tower and basement built approximately in 1966. The building is primarily constructed steel beams and columns supporting concrete floor slabs. The exterior walls consist of brick over block. The interior partitions are constructed of hollow tile, brick and metal overlain by plaster and ceramic tile. Ceilings consist of plaster and exposed concrete. The building has a flat roof overlain by gravel. For the purpose of this Phase, the water tower is to be demolished and the remainder of Building 7 is to remain at this time. The overall goal of this effort is to deter trespassers from accessing the building in the future as the water tower portion of this building has historically been subject to graffiti and vandalism.

BUILDING 44 (STORE HOUSE) is a two-story vacant structure with a flat roof built in approximately 1934. The building is primarily constructed of brick walls on steel beams with concrete floor slabs and a full basement. The interior partitions are constructed of hollow tile, brick and metal. The interior walls are concrete block and brick. Ceilings are exposed concrete. Due to extensive collapse and deterioration of portions of the roof and attic floor due to a recent fire, Building 44 has been condemned. For the purpose of this Phase, Building 44 is to be remediated of hazardous materials and demolished using controlled demolition procedures. Subsequent to the demolition of the structures identified above, limited site restoration activities will also be completed primarily with the northern portion of the Project Site (overlooking Nissequogue River and Short Beach Park) and shall include construction of the site features as summarized below: