About the Project

The former Kings Park Psychiatric Center (KPPC) campus covers 521 acres in the Town of Smithtown in Suffolk County, Long Island.  At the peak of its operation in the 1950s, the Kings Park campus was operated by the New York State Office of Mental Health (OMH) as one of the largest mental health institutions in the world, with 10,000 patients housed in a self-sufficient “city” that had housing and dormitories to house thousands of staff and its own police and fire departments, railroad line, power plant, sewer system, farms, and manufacturing facilities.

OMH decommissioned the KPPC facility in 1996.  Today, more than 60 buildings constituting approximately 2.4 million square feet exist on the property.  The abandoned buildings range in size from small, single family homes to very large institutional buildings including a 13-story former resident and treatment facility and a 10-story hospital.   Virtually all of the buildings are boarded up, power and utilities were long ago turned off, and the campus’ numerous derelict buildings, dormitories, wards, hospital buildings, and residences, some of which are very large structures, continue to deteriorate.

In 2006, the New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation (OPRHP) received jurisdiction over approximately 368 acres of the former KPPC property, which was previously managed by the OMH. Subsequent to this acquisition, OPRHP contracted with a private engineering firm, Dvirka & Bartilucci Consulting Engineers (D&B), in 2008 to conduct a comprehensive study of the costs of remediating environmental hazards and demolishing the 50 vacant, deteriorated buildings on the 368 acres. The results of the study conducted determined that the total cost of remediating the 368 acres was approximately $216 million. Of the total $216 million estimate, $186 million (86%) is comprised of the cost of removing asbestos and other hazardous materials and then demolishing vacant buildings. The remaining elements of the $216 million estimate are primarily associated with: a) remediating asbestos and demolishing the five miles of underground steam tunnels that criss-cross the property ($26 million); and b) cleaning up C&D materials from prior building demolitions that were dumped on the surface or buried in the past before the property was transferred to OPRHP, as well as excavating other adversely impacted soil detected on-site ($4 million). 

Given a funding appropriation of approximately $14 million initiated by the state Senate in 2006 for the project, OPRHP elected to advance a first phase of building demolition activities focusing on 19 relatively small buildings/structures that have deteriorated to the point that there is no potential for future reuse of the structures. These 19 buildings are referred to as the “Fast-Track” Buildings. Of the nineteen buildings/structures identified for demolition, fifteen are on the 368-acre transfer and four are located on the original 153-acre transfer.  Provided below is an aerial photograph depicting the approximate locations of the former KPPC buildings/structures, as well as, a brief description of the existing condition of each respective building/structure included as part of the “Fast-Track Building Demolition Contract”:

Building 35 (Home with Staff Residences) is a two-story vacant structure with a partial basement and section of unfinished crawlspace built in 1931. The first and second floors are constructed of concrete slabs supported by concrete encased steel beams and columns. The roof and attic framing consists of steel trusses spanning the full width of the building and supporting a slate shingled roof. The second floor plaster ceiling is hung from the bottom chord of the steel roof trusses. Some of the walls are constructed with terra cotta face tiles. The exterior walls are constructed of solid brick. Sections of the roof and attic floor are considerably deteriorated and collapsing into the building resulting in unsafe working conditions in these areas of the roof and attic floor. Due to extensive collapse and deterioration of portions of the roof and attic floor, Building 35 is condemned.

Building 36 (Home with Staff Residences) is a two-story vacant structure with a partial basement and section of unfinished crawlspace built in 1931. The first and second floors are constructed of concrete slabs supported by concrete encased steel beams and columns. The roof and attic framing consists of steel trusses spanning the full width of the building and supporting a slate shingled roof. The second floor plaster ceiling is hung from the bottom chord of the steel roof trusses. Some of the walls are constructed with terra cotta face tiles. The exterior walls are constructed of solid brick. Sections of the roof and attic floor are severely deteriorated and collapsing into the building resulting in unsafe working conditions in these areas of the roof and attic floor. Due to extensive collapse and deterioration of portions of the roof and attic floor, Building 36 is condemned.

Building 57 (Maintenance Store/Plumbing) is a two-story vacant structure with a partial basement. Floor construction is timber framing with timber wood trusses supported on exterior masonry walls. Wood girders are supported by steel pipe columns. The exterior walls are constructed of masonry block and concrete. Due to collapsed and unstable materials on the upper floor, Building 57 is condemned.

Building 59 (Former Power Plant) is a two-story vacant structure with no cellar. Several types of construction are present in the building, including reinforced concrete and wood. The concrete framing is constructed of concrete slabs supported by reinforced concrete beams, girders and steel columns. The majority of the façades are constructed of concrete masonry units. A stone retaining wall, integral to the north side of the building, runs parallel to Kings Park Boulevard and must be maintained throughout the course of the remediation and demolition. Due to collapsed and unstable materials within the northeastern portion of the building, Building 59 is condemned.

Building 60 (Shoe Shop) is a one-story vacant brick structure with a concrete slab floor constructed around 1892. Due to the unstable walls and roof, Building 60 is condemned.

Building 122 (Inpatient 51 & 52) is a two-story vacant brick building with a basement, built around 1912 and rehabilitated around 1966. The walls consist of brick and wood framing studs. The building has a concrete slab floor and wood floors. The roof consists of asphalt shingles on wood trusses. Due to collapsed and unstable materials on the first and second floors, Building 122 is condemned.

Building 123 (Kitchen and Dining Room) is a one-story vacant brick building with a basement that was built around 1915. The building has three (3) separate wings. Each wing has an asphalt shingled gabled roof. The first floor framing is timber construction with timber roof trusses supported on exterior brick walls. The roof and the first floor have partially collapsed into the basement. The entrance into the building is blocked by the collapsed roof and framing. Due to collapsed and unstable materials, Building 123 is condemned.

The Barge is a yacht club meeting house built atop a former barge that was run aground in its current location around 1962. The structure has no foundation other than its original wooden hull, which is submerged in 3 to 4 feet of water at each high tide.

Building 55 (Clubhouse) is a two-story vacant wood frame building with asphalt shingles on a hip roof. The lower level of the building has a concrete slab floor whereas the upper level is supported by wood floor joists. The exterior finish of the building is primarily vinyl siding. Northeast of Building 55 is a detached one-story brick walled storage shed with a gabled roof that consists of asphalt shingles on wood sheathing, to be protected.

Alternate 1 - Building 56 (Community Store) is a one-story vacant structure built around 1973. The building is primarily constructed of prefabricated steel panels on steel frame with concrete floor slab and no basement. The exterior walls consist of metal cladding on a steel frame. The steel frame is concealed within wood enclosures supported on brick piers. Some interior partitions are constructed of concrete masonry unit (CMU) block. The floor is constructed of concrete and terrazzo slab on grade. The ceilings are suspended acoustic tiles. The building has a sloping roof which consists of corrugated metal panels supported on a steel structure, to be protected.

Alternate 2 - Building 82 (Morgue) is a two-story vacant structure built around 1928 and potentially utilized as a morgue and print shop. The building is primarily constructed of brick walls on steel beams with concrete floor slabs and a basement. The floor is constructed of asphalt tile, integral mortar surfacing, and ceramic tile. The interior ceilings and walls are primarily constructed of white plaster. The building has hollow tile and brick partitions and a built-up flat roof.

Alternate 3 - Building 47 (Dairy Barn) is a one-story vacant structure built around 1941. The walls consist of concrete block and wood framing studs. The building has a concrete slab floor with timber roof trusses supported on exterior masonry walls. The building has a gabled roof that consists of asphalt shingles on wood sheathing. The portion of the building remaining was once a part of a larger structure that was previously demolished. Two (2) other slabs of demolished buildings are present to the south and west of the existing structure and shall also be removed under this contract.

Alternate 3 - Building 48 (Maintenance & Grounds) is a two-story vacant structure built around 1934. The walls consist of concrete block and wood framing studs. The building has a concrete slab floor with timber roof trusses supported on exterior masonry walls. The building has a gabled roof that consists of asphalt shingles on wood sheathing.

Alternate 4 - Building 6 (Power House Remains) is a one-story vacant brick building with a basement located southeast of the power plant (Building 29). The existing portion of Building 6 was part of a much larger building that served as a historical power plant. The majority of Building 6 was demolished when Building 29 became operational. The remaining portion of the building was retained to provide access to the steam tunnels.

Alternate 5 - Building 5.1 (Salt Storage Shed) is a conical-shaped wood roof structure supported by concrete push walls. The wood roof structure and opening framing appear to be in good condition. There are no stairs or fireproofing within the building.

Alternate 6 - Building 29.1 (Power Plant Smoke Stack) is an approximately 220-foot tall cylindrical structure present on the north side of Building 29. The exterior walls are constructed of solid brick. The structure has an elevated causeway connected to Building 29. A hatch door is located at the base of the stack.

Alternate 7 - Building 29.2 (Power Plant Aboveground Storage Tanks, Truck Unload Area, Pump House, Pipe Trestle and Fuel Island) consists of two (2) 150,000-gallon fuel oil aboveground storage tanks enclosed within a concrete secondary containment area, a truck unload area covered with a corrugated steel roof, a piping trestle, a fuel island and a control and valve room, which are all located northeast of Building 29.

Alternate 8 - Building 29.3 - Power Plant Railroad Piers are approximately 17 concrete piers and one concrete hopper constructed to support a rail line delivering fuel to the power plant. The rail line has been removed, but the piers remain. The piers are approximately 25 feet on center with a height of 15 feet.

Alternate 9 - Building 23 (Buckman Day Treatment) is a two-story vacant brick structure built around 1970. The lower and upper levels are constructed of concrete slabs supported by concrete encased steel beams, girders and columns. The roof structure is wood-framed. A partial roof collapse is present on the south side of the building over the first floor corridor.